Sauce for the Goose… on Toast!

The Arts Council of Princeton‘s annual Sauce for the Goose sale is one of my favorite events of the year.

For a person who loves local artists and artisans, as I do, the holiday season begins with Crafters Marketplace (see earlier post) the weekend before Thanksgiving, a benefit for the YWCA Pearl Bates Scholarship fund that brings artisans from all over the country to a mega show at John Witherspoon School. The excitement continues during the Thanksgiving weekend with the Covered Bridge Artisan’s Tour in Stockton, Lambertville and Sergeantsville.

Then it’s topped off by the Arts Council’s three-week sale of fine art and functional crafts, including  paintings, drawings, ceramics, glasswork, holiday ornaments, greeting cards, photography, jewelry, hats and scarves, and so much more. I love these artists, each and every one, from Libby Ramage to Sally Stang. Many have had exhibits in the building at Paul Robeson Place and Witherspoon Street.

The Arts Council had been talking about changing the Sauce for the Goose name, never quite understanding where it came from, but I see they’ve stuck with it — yay! As a person who loves tradition, I’ve always been fond of the name. To me, it means that by selling their wares, artists will not only be able to put a goose on their holiday table, but they’ll even have spare change to give it some gravy.

This year’s Sauce for the Goose runs from Dec. 6-20 in the Taplin Gallery at the new Paul Robeson Center for the Arts — if you haven’t yet reveled in the new building, here’s your chance. The opening reception  Dec. 6, 6 to 8 p.m., should be loads of fun.

An added attraction this year is a holiday installation by Arts Council instructor Debbie Reichard  in the gallery. Titled “Santa Appears in Toast,” the work consists of more 300 pieces of toasted bread, creating a pixelated image of Santa. Ms. Reichard says “Most of my work includes a joke and some magic.”

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This entry was posted in Central NJ Art, Ceramic Art, Crafts, Emerging artists, Folk Art and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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